This Tiger May Look Unhappy Now, But His Rescue Makes It All Worthwhile!

There are very few types of stories that bring as much joy and relief as a successful rescue story. When that rescue helps not just the animal, but the preservation of a species, it is especially impactful. There have been numerous stories over the years about the devastation done to tiger populations, most notably the near-extinction of the Sumatran tiger in Indonesia. However, the past few decades have brought on incredible conservation and rescue efforts for tigers everywhere. There may be miles to go, but it’s important for us to celebrate our successes as well! We’ve put together a few of the best rescue stories we’ve covered, along with some updates about how the tigers are doing now. Get ready for inspiration!


Cinderella, so named because of the fairy tale quality of her tale, is an Amur tiger. The Amur tiger population dropped to around 20 cats in the 1920’s, but have rebounded to around 400 today. While still endangered and fighting for survival, poaching has also found a resurgence, placing a great deal of strain on the already taxed species.  Luckily, Cinderella was saved from a horrible fate. Discovered in Russia’s Primorsky province, Cinderella was alone at 4-months old. Presumably her parents were victims of poachers, but there is no evidence of what really happened, just an abandoned baby. She suffered from starvation and severe frostbite, which led to the amputation of about a third of her tail.

Cinderella was taken to the newly created Center for Rehabilitation and Reintroduction of Tigers and Other Rare Animals in Russia. They focus on training rescued cubs how to survive in the wild and maintain a fear of humans, a fairly unusual way to handle rescued wildlife. Cinderella spent 15 months at the center, and was finally released into the wild. Soon after, carcasses were found in the fields, proving Cinderella’s ability to hunt on her own, and she eventually thrived!

What’s even more inspiring are the consistent sightings since her release! A number of rehabilitated tigers have been released in the same area, and there is a good chance that we see a population increase in the near future!


This tiger’s tale sounds like the plot of a terrible episode of TV, except instead of a little boy trapped in a well, it was a full-grown tiger! Villager’s in Tezpur, India were shocked to find their local well invaded by a tiger, and quickly called for help. The International Fund for Animal Welfare and Wildlife Trust of India came to rescue the stranded tiger, but were not able to arrive until after dark; not a good time to go tiger hunting! The next day they managed to trap the big cat and release him safely to his (presumed) stomping grounds.

With a strong community effort, this tiger will continue to flourish and help repair the population in India. What a fantastic story!


This may not be a traditional rescue, but finding out that conservation and rescue efforts are making a difference is possibly the most important story of all.

For the first time in 60 years, tigers are appearing in mainland China. While excursions by tigers from Russia do happen, there has not been a permanent presence for six decades, so finding a group of tigers more than 30 kilometers into China shows just how well repopulation is coming along.

It’s wonderful to see just how much of a difference we can all make. And we can still do more! Celebrating success like this proves how much we can do, and why we should keep working.

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Adam Greene may reside in West Michigan, but the majority of his time is spent providing a comfortable lap for his many animals. When not covered in cats, he is probably writing and drinking ridiculous amounts of coffee.