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This Cat Decided to Hang Out in a Bear Enclosure and Made a Friend

The bear enclosure at the Folsom City Zoo Sanctuary has had a special guest for several years: a black feral cat. You’d expect a cat to keep its distance from such large creatures, but this one actually gets along well with Sequoia, one of the biggest and oldest bears at the zoo. The two make quite the pair, and show how even different species can become friends in the right circumstances.According to The Sacramento Bee, the cat has been at the zoo for over seven years as part of its feral cat colony. Zookeepers provide food for these cats, and this one decided it likes hanging out in the bear enclosure. While it comes and goes as it pleases, it has been living in the bear enclosure for over a year.

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The cat took a liking to Sequoia, an 18-year-old black bear with arthritis. Cats and bears have plenty of similar interests, as both animals enjoy lying in the sun and climbing trees. The fact that Sequoia has slowed down from the arthritis may be part of the reason why this cat took an interest in him. The two frequently go on walks together, and the cat has even eaten elk meat with the bears.

Sequoia has a female companion named Tahoe in the enclosure with him, although ABC News reports that the cat is more interested in Sequoia. Neither bear has ever shown any aggression towards their feline companion. Considering how much the cat enjoys hanging out with bears, one zookeeper decided to give it the nickname “Little Bear.”

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Guests have started noticing the pair more and more, and several have mentioned it to the staff at the zoo, thinking the cat is in danger. The staff always tell them that this cat is right where it wants to be.As Little Bear and Sequoia have shown, cats can be friends with anyone. If your cat is your best friend, these pet-owner friendship bracelets might be just the thing.

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